AMST 3005 Create Spaces for Civic Inclusion

Building inclusive communities require long-term, proactive efforts by public leaders. Learn how to create and mobilize diverse coalitions around shared goals to strengthen your community’s civic health. A key characteristic of civically healthy communities is the inclusion of diverse stakeholders. By mobilizing diverse community members around shared goals and values, public leaders can foster resilient, inclusive communities that stand together against bigotry and hate.

In this course, you will learn how to enact long-term, proactive initiatives that bring together diverse coalitions across partisan lines, cultural identities, and faith groups. In particular, you will learn how to foster relationships with underrepresented communities whose voices are critical for inclusive governance and leadership. You will also learn strategies to elevate the reach and impact of your messaging to communities targeted by anti-Muslim bigotry.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify proactive actions public officials can take to prevent anti-Muslim bigotry
  • Identify religiously and culturally diverse community networks where opportunities for inclusion in public or governmental initiatives can be effectively received
  • Understand how to create diverse coalitions and inclusive community dialogues that involve members across partisan lines, cultural and faith groups
  • Identify opportunities for underrepresented communities’ involvement in governance and leadership cultivation

Syllabus

Contributors

Usra Ghazi MTS

Faculty

Senior Advisor, America Indivisible

Melissa Levinson MA

Faculty

Curriculum Writer, America Indivisible
Curriculum Developer, Islamic Networks Group (ING)

M. Arsalan Suleman JD, MPhil

Faculty

Counsel, Foley Hoag LLP. Chair, America Indivisible
Fellow, Georgetown Inst. for Study of Diplomacy. Former Acting US Special Envoy to the OIC.

Zeenat Rahman

Contributor

Director, Inclusive America Project
Aspen Institute

+14 enrolled

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Not Enrolled
$56 for a single course.

Contact Us

Faculty

Senior Advisor, America Indivisible

Staff

Program Manager
America Indivisible

Advisor

Executive Assistant
1791 Delegates • The Foundation for Religious Literacy

Civic Education for a Common Good

We apply the U.S. Department of Education’s Consensus Statements about Constitutional Approaches for Teaching about Religion

▸ Our approach to religion is academic, not devotional;
▸ We strive for student awareness of religions, but do not press for student acceptance of any religion;
▸ We sponsor the study about religion, not the practice of religion;
▸ We expose students to a diversity of religious views, but may not impose any particular view;
▸ We educate about all religions, we do not promote or denigrate any religion;
▸ We inform students about religious beliefs and practices, it does not seek to conform students to any particular belief or practice.

We apply the American Academy of Religion’s “Religious Literacy Guidelines”

▸ “Religious Literacy Guidelines for College Students.” American Academy of Religion, 2019.
▸ “Teaching About Religion: AAR Guidelines for K-12 Public Schools.” American Academy of Religion, April 2010.

We apply the National Council for the Social Studies C3 Frameworks for Religious Studies

College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards, “Religious Studies Companion Document for the C3 Framework.” Silver Spring, MD: National Council for the Social Studies, 2017.